Keyboard Shortcuts

Keyboard shortcuts are a great way to boost your productivity in Revit. And if you are someone who is used to working with keyboard shortcuts in CAD, this feature is going to make your life much easier in REVIT environment.

Pre-Defined Keyboard Shortcuts

Pre-defined keyboard shortcuts are displayed on the tooltip when you hover over the tool in the ribbon. For example,

KS 1.jpg

If a tool has multiple shortcuts, only the first shortcut displays in the tooltip. If you would like to know all the default keyboard shortcuts pre-defined in REVIT, please download one of the following documents:

Custom Keyboard Shortcuts

To add a custom keyboard shortcut to a tool, please use the following procedure:

  • Go to View tab -> Windows panel -> User Interface drop-down -> Keyboard Shortcuts.
    • Alternatively, use “KS” as the shortcut to open the menu
  • In the keyboard shortcut menu, search for the tool for which you would like to add a shortcut.
    • Let’s say we want to add a shortcut to the tool “Roof by Footprint”. Search for this in the search box to locate it in the list.
  • Under the “Press New Keys”, type the shortcut you would like to use for this tool and then click on ASSIGN to assign it.
    • Let’s say, we type “RF” for the Roof by Footprint tool.
  • The shortcut is now listed besides the name of the command, under the shortcut column. Click OK.

Now, next time when you hover over the tool in the ribbon, the tooltip will display the shortcut that you have created.

Rules for Keyboard Shortcut

  • A keyboard shortcut can consist of up to 5 unique alphanumeric keys.
  • You can specify a keyboard shortcut that uses Ctrl, Shift, and Alt with a single alphanumeric key. For example, if you press Control and Shift and D, it displays as Ctrl+Shift+D.
  • If a keyboard shortcut includes Alt, it must also include Ctrl and/or Shift.
  • You cannot assign reserved keys.
  • You can specify multiple keyboard shortcuts for each tool.
  • You can assign the same keyboard shortcut to multiple tools. To select the desired tool when you execute the shortcut, use the status bar.

<<< Back to HOME

Basic Modify Tools

Here are a list of basic Modify Tools that are frequently used in Revit. Click on the tool to learn more about how to use them in Revit.

M2 Modify Tools

Building Information Modeling

Traditionally, the building industry delivered the building projects with manually created drawings on which the information was added by using notes and specifications. With the advance of CAD (Computer Aided Design and Drafting), this process was made more efficient. However, the methodology remained the same. Drawings became computer-based and the information was added on using paper-based pile of specifications and notes. These methods often resulted into uncoordinated, inaccurate and missing set of documentation.

Now, developments in Building Information Modeling (BIM) methods have brought a new perspective on how projects can be managed in the building industry. Here, the information plays a central role in developing 2D and 3D representations of the building model. Both information and the building model are interconnected. As the project progresses from concept towards execution and then operations, information keeps updating and so does the building model. This way, the BIM model becomes a repository of integrated and coordinated set of documentation for the project at the given stage of the project life cycle.

Building_Information_Modeling_Pvt_Ltd

Image Courtesy: wikimedia commons

Thus, Building Information Modeling can be understood as a building design and documentation methodology that integrates coordinated, reliable information about a project from design through operations. The Autodesk® Revit® platform is purpose-built software for building information modeling.

Learn more about Building Information Modeling, HERE.

 

 

Understanding Revit File Formats

Let’s understand different types of file formats in REVIT with following extensions:

M1 file formats

RVT – ReViT project file
The project file (RVT) contains your Revit model with its information. By using a single project file, Revit makes it easier to alter the design and have changes reflected in all associated views (plan views, elevation views, section views, schedules and so on). Having only one project file also makes it easier to manage the project (Although, typically increases the file size compared to CAD applications.)

RTE – Revit project TEmplate file
These are starting point for creating a new project. You may use one of the project templates (RTE) provided in your library as basis to create your project. Later, you may also customise these templates as per your office standards so that it saves you time and effort to make the settings from project to project. Learn more about project templates here.

RFT – Revit Family Template file
Revit family templates serve as starting point for creating a family (elements of Revit). It contains the information that you need for that particular type of family you would like to create. Learn more about family templates here.

RFA – Revit FAmily file
Revit family is the file that contains the model geometry and information of a revit element. You can learn more about Revit families by understanding REVIT elements.

Type and Instance Properties

In the previous chapter ‘Concept of Revit Elements‘, we discussed about how Revit elements are organized in a hierarchy:

Elements -> Categories -> Family -> Type -> Instance.

For many CAD users, families may sound similar to blocks or groups. However, the difference between CAD and BIM is the “information”. Thus, blocks and families are fundamentally different from each other because of the information they carry in their parameters and with which they can be controlled.

Each family is controlled by type and instance parameters within the project. Instance parameters affect individual instances only. Type parameters affect all instances of the same type in the entire project. To explain this, let’s go back to our example of chairs that we learnt in Concept of Revit Elements.

M2 Revit Elements

Now in this room, there are two types of desk chairs – blue and black. Let’s say that we want to change the color of all the blue chairs to red. If the color parameter is part of “type properties”of the family, then changing the value of the color in one chair would automatically affect all the 5 blue chairs present in the project. But, if the color parameter is part of the “Instance properties” then, changing the value of the color in one chair would affect only that particular chair. The remaining 4 chairs would remain blue.

In system families, type and instance parameters are pre-defined. For example, the thickness of the wall, by default, is a type property. Whereas, the height of the wall is an instance property.

For loadable families, you can decide which parameters to include as type and which as instance, depending on how you want to control the behavior of the family. This is typically done while you are creating a new family or editing an existing one.

Learn more about differences between type and instance parameters in a Video Tutorial by Autodesk.